Author Webinar February 22

Author Webinar February 22

Getting along with others is foundational to success in personal and professional life. In an increasingly diverse and complex world, we need to overcome distance and tight schedules to achieve shared goals. But how do we learn to work together if our learning experiences focus on individual performance? In this webinar we’ll use Janet Salmons‘ Taxonomy of Collaboration as a framework for understanding dynamics of the collaborative process. We’ll discuss ways to embed collaborative skills-building into assignments, courses, and/or curricula that engage students of all ages.

 

 

Register now to join this free Stylus webinar on February 22! 

Click for your time zone.

 

Collaboration Webinar at the Connecting Online Conference

I presented a webinar,  at the free Connecting Online Conference. Click link to access the recording for Designing and Evaluating Collaborative Projects: Three Conceptual Frameworks.

 Resources:

E-Social Constructivism in Context

Description of the session

What is collaboration? We’ll define it as: “an interactive process that engages two or more participants who work together to achieve outcomes they could not accomplish independently” (Salmons, 2014). Collaborative advantage refers to the synergistic outcomes that could not have been achieved by any player acting alone (Huxham & Vangen, 2005). To achieve collaborative advantage, participants need to do more than work together—they need to think together. Achieving collaborative advantage offers the potential for new ideas and innovation, shared ideas and peer learning.

Collaboration online offers many possibilities: we can bridge time and distance, share resources, and engage using verbal, visual or written communications. However, collaboration online also offers many challenges. How do we decide on shared goals and ways to achieve them? What technologies should we use? How do we decide who does what? And for instructors using collaborative projects, how can I know who contributed and how can I evaluate students individually and collectively?

The session will offer practical tips and resources for developing a clear design for the collaborative project, organization of the process and evaluation of the outcomes. Three conceptual frameworks will be introduced: the theory of e-social constructivism (Salmons, 2009), Taxonomy of Online Collaboration and the Typology of Collaborative Assessments (Salmons, 2006, 2007, 2014).