#VitaeWednesday: Publications for Academics & Pracademics

Use your dissertation as the basis for scholarly or practical publications!

Join me for a #VitaeWednesday webinar with Vitae, the Chronicle of Higher Education career website!

What did you learn from your research and how can you use it to propel your career forward? A publication list is essential, whether you are trying to compete for a tenure-track faculty position or launch a consulting business. When you publish your work, you position your type of research and findings, and create a public identity. How do you want to be known? What are the options in today’s digital world, and where do you start? Find out when you join us on May 25! See more and register on the Vitae site, where the discussion is already underway!

Learn more, see www.path2publishing.com

5 Ways to Use Your Dissertation for Publications

TAAJoin me for a webinar with the Textbook and Academic Authors Association!

5 Ways to Use Your Dissertation for Publications

Registration: https://taaa.memberclicks.net/events
Date: Wednesday, May 18, 3-4 p.m. ET. Find your time zone here.
Free to TAA members. Not a member? Membership is affordable, and worthwhile. Join, let’s learn from each other and share ideas about academic writing!

5ways-TAAYou spent a lot of time conducting research and writing a dissertation, thesis, or capstone project. You are well aware of the pressure to get your work published, in order to get hired or advance in your academic or professional field. Where do you start? I mined every element of her dissertation to launch a publishing strategy that has resulted in five books, numerous chapters and cases, articles and blog posts. I’ve created a typology of five options for drawing from, building on, or applying your student writing. This webinar is relevant those who have graduated recently as well as to people whose dissertations have been sitting on the shelf for a while.

Learning to Research, Researching to Learn

Free webinar as part of the Connecting Online for Instruction and Learning Conference

Learn how to incorporate research activities into your online or blended class. Join me for a free webinar: Getting Started: Teaching Online Research Design Basics –  Monday 4 April 2016 – 3 pm (SAST) Find your time zone here.

 

Students in research methods classes benefit from the experiential activities that invite them to develop and practice skills associated with qualitative methods, such as interviewing and observing individuals and groups. Students in other curricular classes, including business or NGO management, sociology or education, benefit from research activities that invite them to bridge theory and practice by learning from practitioners or members of the community. Inquiry models of teaching allow us to create meaningful learning experiences online, for e-learning or blended learning classes.

Few textbooks have journeyed with me over multiple cross-country moves from student days at Cornell University to my current IMG_2895bookshelf. Models of Teaching is one I kept, and then updated to a more current edition (Weil, Joyce, & Calhoun, 2009, pp. 86-87). The models that have intrigued me all these years focus on creating communities of learners through engaging social-learning approaches. Yes, you could say their work represents a social constructivist perspective. And while I have given a lot of thought to social constructivism in the online world (Salmons, 2009, 2015), here I want to look specifically at inquiry models of teaching and how we can use them online to build deeper levels of comprehension.

What are inquiry models? Inquiry models of teaching and to stimulate students’ and participants’ curiosity and build their skills in finding, analyzing, and using new information to answer questions and solve problems. Instead of transferring knowledge, we aim to build new knowledge. Instead of providing facts, we create an environment where students are encouraged to look for new ways of looking at an understanding problems, discern important and relevant concepts, and inductively develop coherent answers or approaches. As Weil et al. (2009) explain:

Humans conceptualize all the time, comparing and contrasting objects, events, emotions – everything. To capitalize on this natural tendency we raise the learning environment to give test the students to increase their effectiveness. Working in using concepts, and we hope that consciously develop your skills for doing so. (p. 86)

They suggest 3 guidelines for designing this kind of learning experience (Weil et al., 2009):

  1. Focus: Concentrate on an area of inquiry they can master.
  2. Conceptual control: Organize information into concepts, and gain mastery by distinguishing between and categorizing concepts.
  3. Converting conceptual understanding to skills: Learn to build and extend categories, manipulate concepts, and use them to develop solutions or answers to the original questions.

How can we use inquiry models online? Online research activities can be incorporated into e-learning or hybrid instruction in formal or informal educational settings that reflect the Weil et al.’s guidelines:

  1. Focus: Assignments can begin with a research plan or design- what information is needed to answer what question? What are the parameters for this assignment, including time constraints?
  2. Conceptual Control: Approaches to gathering information can include online interviews with practitioners, experts, or individuals with experience in the topic at hand. Assignments can include observation of online activities, including social media, communities, and posted discussions. Or, assignments can include research and analysis of documents or visual records available online or in digital libraries or archives. Once information and data has been collected, participants organize, prioritize and describe relationships between key ideas.
  3. Converting conceptual understanding to skills: The above activities are of little use unless students can synthesize and make sense of what they’ve studied. What can they do with what they’ve learned– either to further academic study or to develop practical solutions using these new findings? A first step may be a discussion that where individuals or teams share what they’ve learned and invite new insights from others in the class. At this point they may identify new questions or topics for future inquiry.

Why are inquiry models important today? Educators engage learners when learners are engaged in true inquiry. In the digital age we overwhelmed with information, some of it vetted by editors or reviewers, but much of it made freely available by anyone with a point of view and a smart phone. It is ever more important to develop the skills needed to focus on specific questions and discern relevant and credible evidence as needed to address them. Research activities invite students to build critical thinking skills at the analysis and synthesis level of Bloom’s Taxonomy. Whether students or participants are preparing to be scholars or professionals, research skills are essential and modern life. By integrating research experiences into content courses across the curriculum (rather than offer them in methods classes exclusively), students can learn to research and research to learn.

Where can I learn more? Join me for a free webinar: Learning to Research, Researching to Learn on February 5. Enroll here for the Connecting Online for Instruction and Learning Conference to participate in this and other sessions with educators from across the globe. See Doing Qualitative Research Online (2016) and Qualitative Online Interviews (2015), and companion websites, for more assignment suggestions you can adapt to your class.

 

References

Bloom, B., Engelhart, M., Furst, E., Hill, W., & Krathwohl, D. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: Book 1, Cognitive domain. New York: David McKay and Company.
Salmons, J. (2009).E_Social_Constructivism_and_Collaborative_E_Learning. In J. Salmons & L. A. Wilson (Eds.), Handbook of research on electronic collaboration and organizational synergy (Vol. II). Hershey: Information Science Reference.
Salmons, J. (2015). Qualitative online interviews. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.
Salmons, J. (2016). Doing qualitative research online. London: SAGE Publications.
Weil, M., Joyce, B., & Calhoun, E. (2009). Models of teaching (8th ed.). Boston Pearson.

 

Find assignment ideas here. Find a discount coupon for purchasing Doing Qualitative Research Online here.

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Learn how to create your own virtual book tour!

TAA

Go on the (Virtual) Road to Promote Your Book

TAA Blog post: 6 Key takeaways from the TAA webinar, ‘Go on the (Virtual) Road to Promote Your Book.’ The recording is online in the member resources. If you are an academic writer, consider joining!

 

road-tripWhether ​ you are self-publishing or working with a major publisher, you will need to actively promote your textbooks and encourage faculty to adopt them. Traditionally, writers have taken book tours and given talks, but textbook publishers are unlikely to fund world travel. Why not offer a book tour online? With the Doing Qualitative Research Online Virtual Book Tour I did just that. While some “virtual book tours” simply place guest posts or advertisements on potential readers’ sites, my highly interactive approach includes webinars and online discussions with groups or classes. In this one-hour webinar, I will share tales from the virtual road and steps you can take to launch your own tour.

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Teach Doing Qualitative Research Online

If you teach research methods and want to update your course– or perhaps add a whole course focused on digital approaches– see this syllabus for ideas. Plug a few units into an existing course or teach the whole class as outlined.

A course syllabus using Doing Qualitative Research Online is available for download here. Find more assignment suggestions here. Still haven’t purchased Doing Qualitative Research Online? Here is a discount coupon.

How can you use mixed & multi methods online?

If you have access to the Oxford Handbooks through your library, you can now read my chapter “Conducting Multimethod and Mixed Methods Research Online” in The Oxford Handbook of Multimethod and Mixed Methods Research Inquiry.
See: http://bit.ly/1ZTr6Fc.

Abstract
This chapter discusses uses of technology in collection of data for multimethods research designs (i.e., research using more than one approach within a qualitative or quantitative paradigm) or mixed methods studies (i.e., research designs that use both qualitative and quantitative approaches). As selected exemplars show, researchers use a wide range of information and communications technologies such as web and videoconferencing conferencing, e-mail, social media, and mapping tools in studies that may occur in a local community or across the globe. Through an analysis of a set of exemplars and a meta-synthesis of the collection, This chapter examines ways that the unique characteristics of communications technologies influence the experiences of researchers and participants and the phenomena being investigated.

Doing Qualitative Research Online

Doing Qualitative Research Online is now available for order from SAGE Publications!

Use this book to think through the options and ethical implications for designing and conducting your own online research using extant, elicited or enacted approaches. Or teach it, and update your research methods course materials. The companion site includes syllabi, articles, media and lots of assignment ideas.